The Catholic University of America

Courses numbered below 500 are undergraduate courses; courses numbered 500 through 599 are available to undergraduate or graduate students; courses numbered 600 and above are graduate courses.

  

Course Descriptions

Politics (POL)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

POL 111: Introduction to American Government

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the basic institutions and principles of American government with particular attention to constitutional foundations, historical development, and the linkages between those institutions and the public. Required.

POL 112: Introduction to Comparative Politics

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the basic principles of government as exemplified by the developed countries of Europe, the post-communist states of Eastern Europe, and developing countries elsewhere. Depending on the instructor, will examine themes of democratization, institutional design (presidential vs. Parliamentary systems, electoral systems), parties and party systems, and/or in the impact of social and economic change on the conduct and evolution of modern political systems. Required.

POL 202: European Politics

3.00 Credits

European Politics is designed to help students develop a better understanding of political institutions, actors and processes, both within selected European national states as well as in the context of European Union integration. In addition, the course will focus on prominent issues of contention and areas of cooperation, also as they relate to Europe's role in global affairs.

POL 211: Introduction to Political Theory

3.00 Credits

An introductory survey of Western political thought from Plato to modern times, defining the fundamental issues of politics and their relation to the enduring problems of civilization. Required.

POL 212: Introduction to International Relations

3.00 Credits

This course introduces students to important theoretical approaches to the analysis of international relations and applies these approaches to a number of historical and contemporary issues. A sample of topics covered include the causes of war, international institutions, the Cold War, globalization, nuclear weapons, terrorism, and human rights.

POL 220: Introduction to Law and Politics

3.00 Credits

Topics include the nature and function of law, theories of justice, constitutionalism, the Supreme Court and legal reasoning, and varieties of law, such as statutory and regulatory law, common and civil law, and public and private law. American Government.

POL 226: Introduction to Peace Studies

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the theory and practice of peace making and conflict resolution. Introduces major theories of conflict at local, national, and international levels; introduces theory and techniques of negotiation and conflict resolution; and examines successful and unsuccessful efforts at nonviolent conflict resolution at local, national, and international levels. Required for Peace Studies subconcentrators.

POL 230: Politics & The Media: An American-Global Perspective

3.00 Credits

Explore the use of all forms of media including social networking and how historically media is used, abused, paid for and manipulated by campaigns, candidates and governments in 'highly developed' and developing countries. Together we will examine real-life case studies including this U.S. Presidential Election, European & World Elections, Global conflicts and the latest threats to our society. Students will receive Speakers-Media Training and will also be introduced to well known guest speakers who share their experiences in covering the domestic and international political & public policy arenas.

POL 260: Introduction to American Intelligence

3.00 Credits

This course will provide the student with a solid grounding in the functions, activities, and organizations of US intelligence. Classes will chart the development of the US Intelligence community and will cover both theoretical and practical aspects of the profession of intelligence. Extensive readings in classic and contemporary treatments of intelligence, along with exposure to long-time veterans of US intelligence agencies will provide in-depth knowledge and insights into the practice of intelligence. This course is ideal for anyone considering intelligence as a career.

POL 270: Special Topics in Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 285: American Literature and Politics

3.00 Credits

It is widely understood that ideologies and theoretical ideas influence the ways in which people think about politics. But to a much greater extent than is generally recognized, the imagination plays a distinct role in the development of political thought. This course provides an understanding of the imagination and its contributions to political thinking by examining literary works from American authors.

POL 300: Introduction to Asian Politics

3.00 Credits

Characteristics of politics in East Asian nations, namely China, Japan, and Korea. Highlights of geopolitical foundations. Religious-cultural traditions and their influences on political patterns. The impact of the Western penetrations into East Asia, and divergent developments in the three nations. Special role of the United States in East Asia since World War II. Issues of nationalism, Communism, democracy, economic development in contemporary East Asian politics. Major features of interactions among these states and with the world. Problems and prospects. World Politics.

POL 301: Introduction to Public Administration, Governance, and Public Service

3.00 Credits

Students will get an understanding of what careers in government entail and how public administration as a profession is growing. This course explores the origin and development of public administration as a discipline and profession. Lectures examine public service and public policy implementation, namely in city governments. This is a focus on local and national governmental structures and how they implement social policy.

POL 302: Contemporary Issues of Public Policy

3.00 Credits

Permits students to apply the analytical tools acquired in previous courses to the analysis and evaluation of selected current issues of political significance in either domestic or foreign affairs. American Government.

POL 303: Introduction to Environmental Political Theory

3.00 Credits

The course explores the emerging sub-discipline of environmental political theory and its consequences for environmental policy and practice. We survey the historical origins and development of environmental thought in the United States, looking at European thinkers such as Rousseau and the Romantics, as well as John Muir, Thoreau, Emerson, Gifford Pinchot, Rachel Carson, Arne Naess, Aldo Leopold, Wendell Berry and others. We will also look at the importance of particular historical events such as the Hetch Hetchy Dam controversy and the first Earth Day among others. Throughout the class we will also consider contemporary formulations of environmental political theory in light of its history and modern problems. Attention to issues of pollution, national parks, wildlife management and preservation, biodiversity, climate change, animal rights, agriculture, population, environmentalism's relationship to liberal democracy and capitalism, conservation vs. preservation, the environmental imagination, and many more topics will be surveyed.

POL 305: Person and Polity

3.00 Credits

Political theory courses usually begin with a given thinker's political or governmental ideas, referring to assumptions about the human person only subsequently, if at all. This course reverses the process and begins by reviewing different conceptions of the human persons; from these understandings, various politics emerge. Texts vary but will include novels, some philosophical anthropology, and works of contemporary political theory concerned with questions of persons and community. Prerequisite: 211. Political Theory.

POL 307: Global Issues

3.00 Credits

Major issues in the global community (environmental, human rights, arms control, drug trafficking problems, etc.), and the different perspectives by which they are viewed. World Politics.

POL 307A: Refugees and Political Crises

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 308: Transnational Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 309: Politics in the Age of Trump

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 310: The US Presidency

3.00 Credits

A study of this uniquely American institution with attention given to the intentions of the Framers and the importance of the Presidency in articulating national values and shaping American priorities. Emphasis on historical, constitutional, and institutional evolution of the office. American Government.

POL 310A: Islam and the Modern World

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 312: The Civil Rights Movement

3.00 Credits

A course in the Peace Studies Program, which examines the origins, strategies, tactics, and effects of the U.S. civil rights movement, its global impact on other transnational advocacy networks, human rights, nonstate actors, and the intersection of religion and politics. World Politics. American Politics.

POL 313: Urban Government & Politics

3.00 Credits

Analysis of urban governance in contemporary America. Examines urban institutions and economic, cultural, and political contexts as well as processes for resolving conflict and distributing resources. Macro and micro phenomena and approaches to urban life also covered. American Government.

POL 314: American Ethnic Politics

3.00 Credits

Considers the persistence of ethnicity in the American political culture and its influences on the basic structures and processes of public life. Explores the durability of patterns in the historical experience of the United States and the contemporary agendas of American ethnic groups. American Government.

POL 316: The Congress

3.00 Credits

Focuses on the institutions that contribute to congressional lawmaking and representation. Concentrates on the electoral connection, constituency representation, incumbency, partisanship and leadership, committee power and purpose, and institutional development. American Government.

POL 317: American Public Opinion

3.00 Credits

Examines the evolving nature of public opinion in the United States, including the formation of political attitudes, continuities and discontinuities in American public opinion, the myths and realities of polling, and the effects of public opinion polls on the operations of the American polity. American Government.

POL 319: Democracy and Politics in Classical Athens

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 320: Comparative World Media

3.00 Credits

Examines the impact of the mass media on the politics and policy of major nations around the world, including the United States, the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, and China. Particular attention to the political role of global media like VOA, BBC, CNN, and Radio Moscow. World Politics.

POL 321: Mass Media Law and Ethics

3.00 Credits

Acquaints students with American's constitutional heritage of free expression - in particular, its application to the government's involvement with broadcast and print media, as well as with "new technologies." Primary attention to practical issues that affect media professionals, including libel, invasion of privacy, access to government information, open and closed courts, and the powers of the Federal Communications Commission.

POL 322: Federalists and Anti-Federalists

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 323: Constitutional Law I

3.00 Credits

Using a case-law approach, examines the development of leading constitutional doctrines by the Supreme Court, with an emphasis on the policy consequences of court decisions and on the court as a political body. Concentrates on federalism, separation of powers, property rights, and privacy. American Government.

POL 324: Constitutional Law II

3.00 Credits

Using a case-law approach, examines the development of leading constitutional doctrines by the Supreme Court, with an emphasis on the policy consequences of court decisions and on the court as a political body. Concentrates on free speech and freedom of the press, the religious clauses, and the equal protection clause. Students who have not had 323 should see the instructor. American Government.

POL 325: The Future of Europe

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 326: Politics of the Middle East

3.00 Credits

surveys twentieth-century politics of the Middle East from the colonial period through decolonization, independence movements and nation-building, authoritarian states, rentier economics and poverty, modernization, intra-regional conflicts and alliance-making, to the rise of Islamist parties, democratization and the "Arab Spring." This course counts towards the minor in Islamic World Studies as well as the certificate program.

POL 327: Nationalism and Islam: Post-Colonial Movements

3.00 Credits

Nationalism & Islam: Post-Colonial Movements (3 credits) ' compares roles and reactions of Muslim movements to nation-building paradigms and projects in the Middle East and Southeast Asia since de-colonization; Islamist parties and non-party movements in response to modernization in the twentieth century and globalization in the twenty-first century; projects of legal, educational and economic reform from 'third' ways in the Nasser/Period to neoliberalism (Suharto/Sadat) and Islamization.

POL 328: Catholic Social Teaching and Global Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 329: Israel and World Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 330: Counterinsurgency, Stabilization and Reconstruction

3.00 Credits

This course will critically examine counterinsurgency and "small wars," drawing both on academic research and current doctrine. Topics will include counterinsurgency strategy (theory and practice) and critiques of the approach, as well as different approaches to post-conflict reconstruction. It will also consider the historical evolution of American and European approaches. The course will also address important case studies, including Southeast Asia, Central America, and Afghanistan and Iraq.

POL 333: Democracy and Democratization

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 337: Security Studies

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 338: The Art of the Interview

3.00 Credits

The course proceeds from the premise that anyone who asks questions is an interviewer. Specifically targeted to media studies, politics, and business students, the course demonstrates through observation, discussion, and practice that there is a philosophy and set of skills which can be learned, and which together raise ordinary conversation to the level of professional interviewing.

POL 342: British Government and Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 343: Italian Politics (Rome)

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 344: Brazil in World Affairs

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 350: Latin American Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 351: The French Colonial Project and the "Civilizing Mission"

3.00 Credits

This course offers a description and reflection on the French colonization and decolonization process from the Third Republic to the present. Particular attention will be paid to the ideology of colonialism and its consequences regarding the integration of minorities into mainstream French culture and society. Starting with a series of introductory lectures, the course will rely heavily on student participation. In addition, several contemporary French films about the issues at hand will be screened and discussed. Course taught in English; films with English subtitles.

POL 356: Contemporary Islamic Political Theory

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 357: Plato's Other Works

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 359: Ancient & Medieval Poitical Thought

3.00 Credits

A survey of the theorists who formed the tradition of Western political thought, utilizing representative selections from their works. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas. Political Theory.

POL 360: Modern Political Thought

3.00 Credits

The history of modern political thought based on selected readings from the authors themselves. Thinkers include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. Political Theory.

POL 361: American Politics in Film

3.00 Credits

In this course, we will study how films have portrayed, opposed, and even shaped American political institutions and culture. We will examine how films can capture political beliefs or criticize existing policies. Such films as Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, High Noon, The Exorcist, I Robot, and various others from a broad spectrum of genres will be used to explore how politics is reflected in or condemned by popular media. The course will touch on various political topics, including campaigns and elections, political machines, conspiracy, political institutions and offices, and idealistic approaches to politics. Grading for the course will include discussion, several short writing assignments, and a final exam.

POL 363: Politics of the 60's

3.00 Credits

Examines the major events and personalities of this turbulent decade which continues to affect American politics and institutions to this day. Particular attention to the civil rights movement, the rise of the New Left and the New Right, the deaths of President Kennedy and Martin Luther King, and the Vietnam War. American Politics.

POL 365: Post-Cold War Interventionism in U.S. Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 366: Democracy in Elections in France & US

3.00 Credits

This course will compare the French and American electoral systems. It will address different aspects such as: the number and structure of the political parties, the financing and the ruling of the campaigns, the electoral 'stage' and the role and use of the media - TV ads, advertising, debates - in the two countries. In the last part of the course, students will reflect about the notion of 'sovereignty of the people' in the two oldest democracies of the Western world.

POL 367: France, Germany, and the EU

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 369: Politics of the '80s

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 372: Politics and Culture in France and the United States

3.00 Credits

This course is intended to introduce students to the great sweep of political history and culture in two self-styled exceptionalist countries that share so many political values yet are so fundamentally different. Prior introductory courses in Politics and French are helpful but not required; no prior knowledge is assumed. The course will also provide background for an anticipated future summer short-course in Paris.

POL 375: The French "Exception" from Clovis to Hollande

3.00 Credits

The purpose of this course is to show that France has always considered itself a privileged country, apart from all others in the West, and endowed with a universal destiny. Following an interdisciplinary approach, the theme of Exceptionality will be developed along French history through examples in popular culture, literature and arts, politics and society. The course will be taught in English. No prerequisites. Counts for humanities credit.

POL 376: U.S. Foreign Policy Perspectives in the 21st Century

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 400: American Political Parties

3.00 Credits

Examines the vital role political parties play in the American polity. Three aspects of parties are carefully examined: their roles in shaping how governments operate, how party organizations (such as the Democratic and Republican National Committees) lend institutional support to candidates, and how party conditions frame electoral politics. American Government.

POL 400A: U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East

3.00 Credits

This course examines significant events that have guided the conception and application of United States foreign policy towards the Middle East from the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the subsequent fragmentation of the region into nation-states, to the fallout from the attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. on September 11th, 2001 and the polarization of the region thereafter. The course also discusses the major ideational and ideological trends in the United States and how they affect U.S. foreign policy in the region.

POL 400B: Comparative Politics of the Middle East

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 401: Mass Media and American Politics

3.00 Credits

This course examines the pervasive influence of the mass media on American politics. Students will learn about the role of the media in agenda setting, influencing campaigns, media effects on political institutions, and how political leaders use the media to promote their goals. American Government.

POL 402: The Values Divide: American Politics & Culture in Transition

3.00 Credits

This course explores the shifts in American values that have occurred since the 1960s, why values matter in U.S. politics, the divisions between Democrats and Republicans in their responses to these values shifts, and how the present values divide is expressed in not only our political life, but in our social and cultural lives. American Govt.

POL 403: Poverty, Social Welfare, and Public Policy

3.00 Credits

Examines the historical and contemporary origins of poverty in the United States and beyond, the circumstances surrounding the development of the modern "welfare state", and alternative response to the problems of poverty and social welfare around the world. Students required to participate in a service learning experience as part of the course work. American Government, World Politics.

POL 403A: Tocqueville's Political Thought: Hope, Religion, and Democracy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 403B: Crucial Cultural & Political Differences between France & America two centuries after Tocqueville

3.00 Credits

This class analyzes the core cultural and political differences between the French and the American democracies as they have been shaped through the historical process from their foundation to the present. Based on Alexis de Tocqueville's two main works, Democracy in America and the Old Regime and the Revolution, it will focus on specific notions such as: the relationship between religion and politics, the work ethics and the market economy, the role of the civil associations in the fabric of the social bond, the power of the central state. After a series of introductory lectures, the class will rely strongly on students' participation and initiatives. The course will be taught in English.

POL 404: Law and Morality

3.00 Credits

Is it wrong for the law to enforce morality? Can you have a right to do wrong? Should the Constitution be interpreted in the light of morality, or be condemned for its moral flaws? Serious disputes about law revolve around these questions. A survey of leading legal theorists finds that their answers imply distinctive understandings of moral truth, human nature, and even the nature of ultimate reality. Formerly titled "Jurisprudence." Political Theory.

POL 405: National Elections

3.00 Credits

Offered in the first semester of national election years, looks at presidential and congressional elections by examining the role of voters, parties, candidates, and the media, with particular emphasis on recent elections. American Government.

POL 405A: Constitutional Democracy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 406: Environment & Development

3.00 Credits

Considers how economic development, and the policies that support it, affects the environment, both in the United States and Latin America. The course surveys a variety of environmental issues, with special attention to citizen action to address them. Topics may include recent efforts to combat the degradation of the Chesapeake Bay and other restoration projects, the politics of energy and the impact of alternative energy and transportation choices on the environment, grassroots responses to hazardous waste issues, community managed resource exploitation, and urban planning. Students will be expected to participate in Washington-area efforts to address environmental questions as a service learning project in connection with the course. American Politics, World Politics.

POL 407: U.S. Political Leadership to 1912

3.00 Credits

This course will make extensive use of biographical, historical, and political perspectives on leadership in American government with special attention to the founding era and development of nation from 1789 to 1840 and to Lincoln's leadership during the Civil War. Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, John Quincy Adams, and Henry Clay are the primary subjects examined in this course. Using a broad historical sweep, we will assess these prominent American political leaders in the context of personality, constitutional philosophy, leadership skill, and institutional setting.

POL 407A: The Supreme Court

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 408: Congressional Leadership

3.00 Credits

Examines the theoretical and historical origins of the constitutional separation of powers, the legal and theoretical meaning of the separation of powers, and the historical and political consequences of the constitutional structure for interbranch relations and policy making. Topics include divided government, statutory interpretation, control over bureaucracy, and presidential power. American Government.

POL 409: Christian Political Thought

3.00 Credits

Formerly POL 362. Aims to acquaint students with the basic themes of Christian political thought. Locating the headwaters in Biblical Judaism and in New Testament other-worldliness, traces the two dominant, and conflicting streams of Christian political understanding: one from Augustine to the Protestant Reformers to Niebuhr, the other from Aquinas to Maritain and Simon. Political Theory.

POL 410: American Political Thought I

3.00 Credits

This course examines a number of important historical figures, ideas, governing documents, and events from the American colonial period through to the end of the 1850s. The readings and lectures reveal rich and conflicting traditions of American political thought prior to the American Civil War. Among other things, different views on the relationship between religion and politics in America, the Declaration of Independence, the 1787 U.S. Constitution, the relationship between the national government and the States, and the issue of slavery are studied. The course concludes with readings from Tocqueville's Democracy in America. The course also imparts a deeper awareness of what can be called America's unwritten constitution, i.e., the underlying ideas about human nature and politics that drive American political thought.

POL 411: American Political Thought II

3.00 Credits

Survey of American political thought from the Civil War to the present. The course pays particular attention to constitutional theories and disputes during the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and the present. Attention is also given to the emergence of Liberalism and Conservatism as ideological movements in American politics. Authors and figures to be covered include Lincoln, Brownson, Bellamy, Croly, Wilson, Roosevelt, and Reagan.

POL 412A: Homeland Security

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 413A: Power in American Politics

3.00 Credits

The course examines the nature and role of power and influence in American politics. Topics include theories of political power, power and American political culture, the establishment of constitutional government, the power and influence of political institutions, political participation, and economic status and inequality. American Politics.

POL 415: Security in the Information Age

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 419: Interest Groups & American Politics

3.00 Credits

Investigates the origins, maintenance, and behavior of interest groups operating in the American political system; includes the political theory of interest groups, the determinants of group influence (membership, financial capability, and leadership and electoral resources), the tactics of influence, and the effects of interest groups on national governance. Particular focus on the dilemmas for a democracy posed by interest groups. American Government.

POL 420: Contemporary Issues in Congress

3.00 Credits

This undergraduate course uses field research, participant observation and reading and is designed to foster and enable our understanding of the process of government, legislation and representation through attention to theory and practice, information and data collection, institutional and organizational analysis and the use of interviewing and focused reading on contemporary issues in Congress.

POL 423: Politics & Military Strategy

3.00 Credits

Examines the meaning of national security during and after the Cold War, with special emphasis on the evolution of U.S. national security policy.

POL 424: Contemporary Issues in State and Local Government

3.00 Credits

Examines the constitutional foundations of subnational governance and explores the executive, legislative, and judicial consequences of national, state, and local interactions regarding regulations and resources. American Government.

POL 426: Al Qaeda and its Affiliates

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 427: US Leadership Since 1912

3.00 Credits

This course will make extensive use of biography, history, and political science to study U.S. political leadership since 1912. Selected Presidents, Congressional Leaders, and Supreme Court Justices will be assessed in depth for their impact in shaping the institutions, debates, and policies of their day. Prerequisites: Not open to students who have completed Politics 520.

POL 428: Conservatism and American Politics

3.00 Credits

The ideas of conservatism with special reference to contemporary American politics, including foreign policy. Relates conservatism to the American political tradition, the U.S. Constitution, and the two parties. Varieties of American conservatism compared to liberalism and leftism. Theory, American Government.

POL 431A: East Asian Security

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 432: Russian Foreign Policy, 1968 - 2008

3.00 Credits

The purpose of this course is to stimulate students' thinking about Russian perspectives on what the Cold War was about and why it ended the way it did and to offer Russian perspectives on the world order since the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. With regard to the Gorbachev reforms that contributed to the end of the Soviet regime, the emphasis will likewise be on the internal dynamics that undermined the communist order.

POL 435: Cyber Intelligence and US Policy

4.00 Credits

no description available

POL 436: United States, China and International Relations of East Asia

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 437: Countering Terrorists and Radicals

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the various counterradicalization and counterterrorism approaches that have been adopted by European countries (among others, the UK, France, Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, and Denmark) and the United States after 9/11. It will focus on the legal reforms and institutions countries have introduced to counter Jihadi terrorism, as well as more recent efforts to prevent Muslim radicalization in the first place.

POL 438: Power, Ethics & Constitutionalism

3.00 Credits

Examines the moral dimension of politics with emphasis on the relationship between constitutional government and its moral and cultural preconditions'the 'unwritten' constitution. Discusses different notions of power. Gives special attention to the American political tradition and contemporary American politics. Explores threats to and prospects for American constitutionalism. Political theory. American politics.

POL 439: Who Are We? Modern Lit, Film, & Pop Culture

3.00 Credits

What is the human condition? How do we know truth? Art, including literature, film, and pop culture, is well equipped to answer these questions. Sometimes images, metaphors, and symbols can better illuminate human nature, politics, and self-understanding than political treatises alone. In this class we will examine films including Apocalypse Now (1978), The Lives of Others (2007), Life is Beautiful (1998); novels including Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk, Animal Farm by George Orwell, and The Road by Cormac McCarthy; and aspects of popular culture including relevant television series such as House of Cards and various prominent celebrities such as the Kardashians and the Duck Dynasty Robertsons, among others. The aim is to understand how imaginative representations of reality reflect a people's politics. Counts for Political Theory.

POL 440: Russian Defense and Security

3.00 Credits

In this course I intend to provide a close look at Russia's national security policy from 1992 to the present, and to offer a survey of key elements of the Russian government linked to the country's security policies, like the Kremlin's Security Council, the Defense Ministry, the Ministry of Interior, the Federal Security Service (FSB) and the Foreign Intelligence Service (SVR). I would also cover the country's defense doctrine and its military forces, including the Defense Ministry's Russian Armed Forces (Ground Forces, Air Force, Navy, Strategic Missile Forces, the GRU military intelligence, Airborne Troops and Space Forces), the Internal Troops and paramilitary forces of the Ministry of Interior, the Border Troops of the FSB, the various special forces of the Defense and Interior Ministries, and of the FSB and Foreign Intelligence Service. I will discuss Russian civil-military relations in the post-Soviet period, the issue of military reform and modernization of the armed forces in light of the defense challenges of the 21st century, international military cooperation with ' and arms exports to - countries such as Algeria, Libya, Syria, India, China, Vietnam, Indonesia and Venezuela, the First and Second Chechen Wars, and the War of Georgia of 2008. The course will cover also Russian defense and security policies in terms of NATO's expansion and its agreed missile defense system, the war in Afghanistan, and with regard to regional multilateral defense and security organizations such as the Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) and Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). Finally, I will wrap up the course by contemplating the aims sought by the Kremlin in terms of its security and defense policies, and where Russia is heading militarily taking these factors into consideration.

POL 442: French Liberal Thought and Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 443: Politics of Overseas Bases and American Empire

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 444: Politics in Film

3.00 Credits

The film industry is arguably America's most influential contribution to popular culture, yet it is often seen as merely a form of entertainment. This course will consider the extent to which American films provide a unique perspective on the self-understanding of America. Films intended for a mass audience must somehow interpret society to itself. They are representative creations in a way that is parallel to political representation. In that sense films, in the hands of the best creators, aim at a truth the audience can recognize as authentic. What is the political self-understanding they depict?

POL 445: US Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

An introduction to the institutions, processes, and debates of United States foreign policy making. Formal constitutional powers as well as informal types of power exercised over foreign policy by the various branches of government; theories of how the foreign policy making process works; the decision making process; tensions between democracy and foreign policy; the media and U.S. foreign policy; current debates in U.S. foreign policy. World Politics.

POL 446: European Integration

3.00 Credits

Covers the developments of European integration after World War II. The history, the institutions, and the policies of EC-EU with special focus on institutions and their interplay in the decision-making mechanism. Future prospects of EU with regard to its enlargements to Eastern European countries. The future of transatlantic relations. World Politics.

POL 447: Nuclear Weapons After the Cold War

3.00 Credits

This course will explore the state of nuclear weapons in "the second nuclear age." Topics include regional nuclear powers, modern nuclear strategy, extended deterrence and alliance dynamics, proliferation, terrorism, limited nuclear war, new technologies, post-Cold War nuclear weapons treaties, the U.S. modernization debate, and the global disarmament movement.

POL 448: Religion & World Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 449: Eastern and Central Europe PE

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 450: Public International Law

3.00 Credits

This upper-level course, which presumes a basic introduction to political theory, explores the nature, sources and methods of Public International Law and their relation to other disciplines. Topics in international law will include, among other things, the status, jurisdiction and behavior of states, international organizations (such as the United Nations), and the International Court of Justice; the protection of the global environment and of human rights; and the law governing use of force and international humanitarian law concerning war crimes and crimes against humanity. Attention will also be given to the status of the Holy See and Catholic conceptions on international law, including Just War Theory.

POL 454: Comparative Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the foreign policy institutions, decision-making processes, pillars, issues, and perspectives of various Western and non-Western countries. Case studies will include, among others, China, Iran, Russia, Pakistan, India, Turkey, the UK, France, Germany, and Brazil.

POL 455: American Political Development

3.00 Credits

An examination of political change and institutional development in American national government. Topics include theories of American political development; the origins of Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court, and significant changes in each over time; and how the political interactions between institutions have shaped their development and that of the American state

POL 456: Congress and Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 457: War in the Modern World

3.00 Credits

This course provides an introduction to war as a political and social phenomenon and as a force in the international system. Major themes include: the development of leading ideas about war; the mutual interactions of politics, society, and warfare; the impact of military doctrine on war fighting; allocation of resources and coordination of effort among land, sea, and air forces; national strategic cultures, and their implications for strategic practice.

POL 458: The Media and Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 459: Human Rights Politics in Asia

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 460: International Conflict Resolution

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 461: Advanced International Relations Seminar

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 463A: Russia Under Yeltsin, Putin, and Beyond

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 468: The FBI and Counterintelligence

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 469: Terrorism, Counterterrorism and Civil Liberties after 9/11: European and U.S. Approaches

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 470: Communism Theory and Practice

3.00 Credits

Communism is a term often used but rarely well understood. If you're curious about what it actually was, how it came to capture the imaginations of roughly half the globe, and why such a seemingly well intentioned ideology almost invariably ended tragically you should sign up for this course. We will use a combination of philosophical and historical texts balanced with memoirs, movies, and art to explore the tension between utopian political blueprints and reality.

POL 471: Issues in Contemporary U.S. Intelligence

3.00 Credits

The conduct of intelligence by the United States is intended to enhance national security but also creates contentious issues for our democracy. This course will allow students to learn from current and former intelligence officials how intelligence is actually collected, analyzed, and used, and how intelligence activities conducted by a free society create challenges and even dilemmas for policymakers and intelligence professionals alike. Examining many of the antecedents behind these contemporary issues, this course will emphasize both continuity and change in intelligence activities. This course is highly recommended for students considering or intending to apply for positions in the US Intelligence Community. This course formally requires POL 260 (Introduction to American Intelligence) as a prerequisite, but exceptions can be granted by the professor.

POL 472: National Security Processes

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the roles of the President, the National Security Council, the Congress, and the Intelligence Community in the formulation and implementation of national security policy. Special attention will be given to the impact of presidential organization of advisory and decision-making processes in shaping national security policy. Case studies will include the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the Iraq Wars of 1991 and 2003, the problems in intelligence gathering and interpretation in the pre-Pearl Harbor (1941), pre-9/11 (2001) and pre-Iraq intervention (2003) cases. Other case studies will include the battle of Midway, the Bay of Pigs, the major decisions on intervention and escalation in Vietnam during Lyndon Johnson's presidency, and the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.

POL 473: International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 474: Topics in International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 475: Advanced Special Topics in Politics

3.00 Credits

Fall 2015: The goal of this course is to develop the capacity to engage critically on political issues. There will be short articles and excerpts that will be read closely in order to appreciate their substantive points and argumentative structure, and to become familiar with fundamental ways of thinking about politics, society and the person. The emphasis will be on the preparation and presentation of reasoned arguments by students, and the ability to self-critique and critique others in a constructive fashion. Students at any level of studies should benefit from the course.

POL 476: Politics and Literature

3.00 Credits

Comedy as Critique: This course will address the serious lightness of comic texts that drew out the most embarrassing, unexpected, and unacknowledged defects of the regimes from which they came. Authors include Aristophanes, Voltaire, Krzhizanovsky, Kafka, Delillo.

POL 477: Political Theory of the American Framing

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 478: Environmental Politics

3.00 Credits

This undergraduate course will introduce students to some of the major problems and issues in environmental politics and policy, and to the different national and theoretical perspectives by which these issues are viewed.

POL 479: Advanced Topics in Public Law

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 480: Critical Political Theory

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 492: Undergraduate Directed Readings

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 494: Undergraduate Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 495A: Congressional Internship

3.00 Credits

A combination of lectures, discussions, and internships arranged for students in congressional offices and committees.

POL 495B: Washington Internship

3.00 Credits

The Washington Internship is a seminar offered in conjunction with an approved internship which is typically 12-15 hours at the site each week. Students write descriptive, analytical and reflective essays and present progress reports regarding their internships which assess managerial problems and dilemma solving techniques, policy issues and conventional explanations in light of the practices and rationales observed at the internship.

POL 496A: Senior Honors Thesis

3.00 Credits

For qualified students, with permission of the department. Faculty supervision in the researching and writing of a major research paper.

POL 496B: Senior Honors Thesis

3.00 Credits

For qualified students, with permission of the department. Faculty supervision in the researching and writing of a major research paper.

POL 498: Undergraduate Comprehensive Examination

0 Credits

no description available

POL 500: Morality and Power

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 500A: U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East

3.00 Credits

This course examines significant events that have guided the conception and application of United States foreign policy towards the Middle East from the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the subsequent fragmentation of the region into nation-states, to the fallout from the attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C. on September 11th, 2001 and the polarization of the region thereafter. The course also discusses the major ideational and ideological trends in the United States and how they affect U.S. foreign policy in the region.

POL 501: Globalization

3.00 Credits

This course considers the heated debates over Globalization. What is it? Is it desirable or devastating? Is economics overshadowing politics, or is globalization just an updated form of imperialism? Is globalization inevitable? What impact does globalization have on politics and the state, on economics, the environment, human rights, labor, culture, borders, security, and policy? How do local government and politics fit into a global age, and where do political accountability and authority lie? Is the state withering away? What will the future institutions of governance look like? Is foreign policy dead, because it is no longer "foreign?"

POL 502: Religion and World Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 503A: Tocqueville's Political Thought: Hope, Religion, and Democracy

3.00 Credits

Following a presentation of Alexis de Tocqueville's life and work, this course aims to generate a reflection on the political, social, and morale characteristics of modern democracy in the West. The course will unfold in four parts: a description of the basic principles of a democracy as a political and civil society; the role of faith and religion in a democratic society; a comparative approach of the advent and development of modern democracy in France and in the U.S.; a critical assessment regarding the loyalty of our society to the original democratic principles and values defined by Tocqueville. This course is of particular relevance at the beginning of a new presidency that, for many reasons, also represents a new chapter in the history of American democracy.

POL 503B: Crucial Cultural & Political Differences between France & America two centuries after Tocqueville

3.00 Credits

This class analyzes the core cultural and political differences between the French and the American democracies as they have been shaped through the historical process from their foundation to the present. Based on Alexis de Tocqueville's two main works, Democracy in America and the Old Regime and the Revolution, it will focus on specific notions such as: the relationship between religion and politics, the work ethics and the market economy, the role of the civil associations in the fabric of the social bond, the power of the central state. After a series of introductory lectures, the class will rely strongly on students' participation and initiatives. The course will be taught in English.

POL 504A: Regional Economic Growth

3.00 Credits

Well-planned and executed growth can result in long-term, sustainable economies and an enhanced quality of life. This course will use a case study to approach and assess the theoretical and practical aspects, as well as the success and failures, of fostering economic growth at the local and regional levels.

POL 505: Parties and Leaders in the U.S. Congress

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 505A: Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice

3.00 Credits

What is distinctive about the polity in which we live? What are the most important elements that created and sustain it? Can it be exported? Why should we care? We will consider these questions in historical and theoretical perspective, focusing on key influences and observers, such as early liberal and republican thinkers, the American framers, Tocqueville, the Progressives, and modern social science, ideology and law.

POL 505B: Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice (UH)

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 507: The Supreme Court

3.00 Credits

This course will cover the composition, structure and practices of the Supreme Court, with an emphasis on the selection of justices and the impact of leading justices past and present on constitutional law., politics and public policy. Intended for graduate students and undergraduates who are completing the prelaw sequence.

POL 508A: Civil-Military Relations

3.00 Credits

This course examines the basic concepts and issues in civil-military relations. It offers a historical and comparative analysis of different patterns of military participation in politics, defense policy making and national development. The course also introduces alternative models for structuring civil-military relations and critically examines the models adopted by the United States and other nations.

POL 519B: Environmental Politics and Policy

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce students to some of the major problems and issues in environmental politics and policy, and to the different perspectives by which these issues are viewed. Environmental problems often cross the borders of states, but governance largely stops at the border, thus environmental politics and policy move beyond sovereignty in both the nature of problems and solutions. How can environmental issues be tackled in a system that is based on sovereignty? How do globalization and non-state actors facilitate both environmental problems and attempts to manage them? We will begin with a brief examination of various approaches to environmental problems and the history of the environmental movement, and proceed to an examination of approaches to manage environmental issues, as well as critiques of these laws and institutions. Environmental issues are difficult because they involve debates about the costs, benefits, and distribution of costs and benefits of environmental protection, as well as debates over appropriate political institutions to mediate the debates or implement solutions (who decides, who participates, and who has the authority to implement and monitor solutions). While there may be broad agreement that the environment is worth protecting in general, specific arrangements for environmental management involve political debates such as disputes over public vs. private property, individual vs. community goods, sovereign vs. non-sovereign authority, present vs. future generations, and the appropriate level of decision making authority (from global to local), to name just a few.

POL 520A: Lincoln and Political Leadership

3.00 Credits

This course will focus on Abraham Lincoln's development as an individual and as a political leader. We will look at his brief stint in the Blackhawk War, his days as a self-taught lawyer in Illinois, his service as a legislator in Springfield, the influence of Henry Clay on his early political development, and his term in Congress. We will then look at Lincoln's campaigns for the U.S. Senate and Presidency. Detailed attention will be given to Lincoln's tenure as President of the United States, including his use of the Cabinet as a forum for advice and decision-making, his extraordinary use of executive power during the Civil War, and his detailed management of military and political affairs as President.

POL 522A: Elections of 2012

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 523: Voting and Elections

3.00 Credits

Studies elections in the United States with special attention to the seminal works in the field. Among topics are who votes and why, the definition of voter choice, the nature of political conflict, the forming of political coalitions, the technology of campaigning, and whether voting really matters.

POL 530: Classics of Political Economy

3.00 Credits

A reading of seminal works in the theory of political economy. Authors include David Hume, Adam Smith, David Ricardo, J.S. Mill, Karl Marx, Carl Menger, Ludwig von Mises, Joseph Schumpeter, F.A. Hayek, John Keynes, and others.

POL 532A: Russian Foreign Policy, 1968 - 2008

3.00 Credits

The purpose of this course is to stimulate students' thinking about Russian perspectives on what the Cold War was about and why it ended the way it did and to offer Russian perspectives on the world order since the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991. With regard to the Gorbachev reforms that contributed to the end of the Soviet regime, the emphasis will likewise be on the internal dynamics that undermined the communist order.

POL 539A: Comparative Politics of the Middle East

3.00 Credits

Comparative Politics of the Middle East looks at the modern development of various political trends in the Middle East region through a focus on analysis of relevant themes and various case studies. Some of the major concepts that will be explored in this course include the introduction of the modern nation-state system into the region, Arab and state nationalism movements, the political economy of natural resources, growth in political Islam, theories of global religious terrorism, and influence of US foreign policy in the region. The class will also look at various cases of state development including Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel and Palestine, Lebanon, and Algeria. Student requirements will include short papers, presentations on reading materials and class topics, and a final paper coordinated in conjunction with the instructor.

POL 542: British Politics

3.00 Credits

Examination of British Constitutional tradition and practice: the Office of Prime Minister, Cabinet, Civil Service, Parliament Parties, Ideologies, and Issues.

POL 545: Contemporary Issues in the UK

3.00 Credits

Reading and tutorial offered in conjunction with 542, for students in Leeds-CUA Congressional Parliamentary Exchange.

POL 545A: Congress and Parliament

3.00 Credits

Reading and tutorial in comparative legislative theory and practice. Offered to students in the Leeds-CUA Congressional Parliamentary Exchange program.

POL 548: Contemporary Political Theory

3.00 Credits

Selective review of major trends in contemporary political theory. Recent courses have examined the thought of German and French critical theorists, structuralism and post-structuralism, phenomenology, deconstruction and language theorists. Authors include Nietzsche, Heidegger, Arendt, Foucault, MacIntyre, Habermas, and Schutz.

POL 553: Constitutional Theory and Interpretation

3.00 Credits

Considers the legitimacy of judicial review and the difficulties in interpreting constitutional text. Topics include the meaning of language, originalism and the search for fundamental values, and the moral, epistemological, and political implications of different theorists and schools of thought.

POL 555: Conservatism

3.00 Credits

Examines varieties of modern conservative thought from Edmund Burke to the present, with particular emphasis on American thinkers. Relates the ideas of conservatism to the classical and Christian tradition and modern historicism, and distinguishes them from competing currents of thought. Formerly 556.

POL 556: The Moral Problem of Politics

3.00 Credits

The meaning of morality in politics. Idealism versus realism. Machiavelli's challenge to the classical and Christian traditions. The things of Caesar. The ethics of power. Constitutionalism. Democracy. A historicist conception of morality.

POL 557A: Transnational Security Challenges

3.00 Credits

What sorts of transnational security challenges do states face in the information age, and how do they manage these threats? Global threats such as nuclear proliferation, climate change, environmental degradation, refugee streams, or infectious diseases do not stop at national borders. Terrorist and criminal networks not only transcend international borders, but also go beyond traditional state jurisdictions and stove-piped hierarchies. This course will analyze the nature of the challenges and look at the policy, legal, and institutional mechanisms the United States and other countries have found/must find to manage and counter these threats.

POL 557B: Security Studies

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 558: Just Peace

3.00 Credits

When wars end, how do polities resolve issues of justice related to the conflict while building post-war peace? Examines war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, amnesty, and other ways polities balance issues of justice with other needs in ending conflicts. Considers both internal and international wars.

POL 559: The Media and Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

The "CNN effect" had become a cliche, but is often assumed and rarely systematically studied. To what extent does the media influence foreign policy, and to what extent are governments able to manipulate media coverage of foreign policy? How can the media affect foreign policy, over what types of issues are they more likely to exert an influence, and with what effect on the outcome of foreign policy? How do governments deal with the media coverage of foreign policy, and how effective are various media strategies? Freedom of speech and of the press are important components of democracies, yet secrecy may often be necessary for the successful conduct of foreign policy. How can these seemingly opposed concerns be reconciled? This course will use case studies to examine these issues, with a focus on US foreign policy (although not exclusively).

POL 560: Issues in United States Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

The end of the Cold War has brought a resurgence of debate over United States foreign policy. The opening of societies, the opening of economies, and the opening of technologies present new challenges and new opportunities for U.S. foreign policy. This course begins with an examination of debates on current foreign policy issues, turning to a regional focus, to see how the issues develop in foreign policy toward particular regions.

POL 562: Seminar: American Political Development

3.00 Credits

The course examines advanced theories of political change and institutional development in the United States. Particular focus is given to political institutions and the importance of ideas in shaping institutional change. Topics include the influence of political culture and beliefs; theories of realignment, junctures, and regimes; the role of time and sequence in institutional development; coalitions and sectional interests shaping institutional structure; and the relative contribution of entrepreneurs and organized groups.

POL 563: Politics of Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia

3.00 Credits

An examination of Russian political and economic development and foreign policy under Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and Putin. Junior standing.

POL 563A: Russia Under Yeltsin, Putin, and Beyond

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 568A: Comparative Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 572A: Politics of Overseas U.S. Bases

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 575: International Politics: Atlantic Alliance

3.00 Credits

Treats the history of United States relations with Western Europe since World War II in its political, economic, and military dimensions, structural and collective goods theories of alliances, and the transition to the post-Cold War world.

POL 577: Political Theory of the American Framing

3.00 Credits

Considers the political theory of the origins of the United States Constitution and its implementation in the American government. Readings include The Federalist, various writings of the Anti-Federalists, writings of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, excerpts from the records of the Constitutional convention, as well as major secondary sources.

POL 577A: Religion and the American Founding

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 579: Capitalism

3.00 Credits

Surveys major theoretical contributions to understanding of economic, political, social, cultural, and ethical issues within capitalist systems. Uses advanced industrialism, developing countries, and newly industrializing countries as case studies.

POL 580: Critical Political Theory

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 583: Comparative Political Development

3.00 Credits

Surveys the major theoretical and descriptive literature on the subject of economic and political development. Topics include political culture, socialization, political parties, ideologies, regional, and decision-making process of selected developing countries.

POL 595A: Congressional Internship

3.00 Credits

A combination of lectures, discussions, and internships arranged for students in congressional offices and committees.

POL 595B: Washington Internship

3.00 Credits

The Washington Internship is a seminar offered in conjunction with an approved internship which is typically 12-15 hours at the site each week. Students write descriptive, analytical and reflective essays and present progress reports regarding their internships which assess managerial problems and dilemma solving techniques, policy issues and conventional explanations in light of the practices and rationales observed at the internship.

POL 595C: British Parliamentary Internship

6.00 Credits

Internships in London as research assistants/personal aides to members of the British Parliament. Full-time voluntary professional work for ten weeks during the late spring and early summer.

POL 595D: London Parliament Internship

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 595E: Internship (Stonehill)

6.00 Credits

no description available

POL 599: Northern Ireland: Conflict and Culture

3.00 Credits

Follows the origins and development of the Northern Ireland conflict from the 1960s to the present and explores the cultural (especially literary) renaissance proceeding in tandem with that conflict. Through the double focus of "poetry and politics," looks at the work of such writers as Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, Derek Mahon, and others, while taking due account of the "Troubles" in political terms--the IRA, Protestant paramilitaries, the politics of the British and Irish governments, and the emergence of a new political system for Northern Ireland in the wake of the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.

POL 601: Executive Branch Policy Making

3.00 Credits

Examines the roles of the White House staff, Cabinet, National Security Council, and executive agencies in the formulation and implementation of foreign and domestic policy. Special attention to the organization and management of policy-making processes in the executive branch.

POL 601A: The President and National Security

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 602: Seminar in Comparative Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

This will be a discussion-oriented seminar focused on exploring variation in foreign policy objectives, behavior, and outcomes across countries and across time. How do domestic political institutions and actors affect the foreign policy process? Do national cultures and diplomatic styles affect interstate negotiations? What explains governments' divergent responses to security threats? Class readings will cover analytical tools of foreign policy analysis as well as major historical cases of foreign policy decisionmaking on issues of war, peace, and international cooperation and organization.

POL 603: The Psychology of Foreign Policy Decisions

3.00 Credits

An examination of political psychology theories (cognitive, behavioral decision theory, belief systems, personality, etc.) of foreign policy decision making and their application to historical cases.

POL 604: Topics in Legal and Social Theory

3.00 Credits

Topics may include theories of distributive justice, the tension between rules and discretion in judicial decision making and policy implementation, the art and science of legal reasoning, and other normative and institutional issues.

POL 605: Political Science & the American Polity

3.00 Credits

A consideration of the foundations, development, and challenges to liberal democracy, and the role of political and social science in a liberal polity. Examination of major schools and disputes in political science, with applications to eras and institutions of American politics.

POL 606: Intro to International Relations

3.00 Credits

An introduction to International Relations theory, including major theories and research on the causes of war, the bases for international cooperation, and the character of the post-Cold War world.

POL 607: Graduate Introduction to Comparative Politics

3.00 Credits

Theories and research on comparative political institutions, political culture, political development, and political violence.

POL 608: Rethinking United States Foreign Policy Institutions

3.00 Credits

The structures of United States foreign policy institutions developed to deal with issues of the past. How can this machinery be recreated or retooled to better address the issues of the future? Historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy institutions, changing requirements of international problems, obstacles to and incentives for institutional change.

POL 609: Contemporary Problems in American Military Strategy

3.00 Credits

Surveys major issues in American military strategy; for students with some background in world politics, United States foreign policy, or related fields. Topics include the relationship of national strategy, military power, and the use of force; evolution of military doctrine and technology; future requirements for military forces and the division of resources; nuclear strategy, arms control and strategic defense; the notion of a distinctly American "way of war." World Politics. Staff.

POL 610: Graduate Introduction to Security Studies

3.00 Credits

The impact of nuclear weapons on military strategy and policy; strategic and extended deterrence; coercion and compliance; proliferation and strategic defense.

POL 611: Economic Issues and National Security

3.00 Credits

A review of major economic trends which have significant impact on the security of major Western and non-Western powers. Topics include raw material supplies, productivity, economic warfare, and informal penetration.

POL 612: Post Cold War Intervention

3.00 Credits

In the Post Cold War era, there are increased opportunities for intervention as states collapse into internal violence; there is decreased consensus over when, if ever, to use tools of military or humanitarian, unilateral, multilateral, or United Nations intervention. Course surveys problems of state failure, theories of sovereignty, and the rise of non-sovereign actors playing increasing roles in interventions. Examines international ramifications of state collapse and internal conflict; considers various means of international interventions.

POL 613: Tradition and Modernity: The Urban Experience

3.00 Credits

Examines the ancient city and the historical notions of city that developed in Europe. Also examines the American urban scene and assesses the contemporary urban policies of other nations, as well as the various ideological approaches to urban change and civic order in the Third World.

POL 614: Seminar: American Ethic Politics

3.00 Credits

An inquiry into the origins and current practices related to the participation of American ethnic groups in social, political, economic, and cultural institutions of the United States.

POL 615: Theories of Interpretation and Critique

3.00 Credits

Considers hermeneutics, Frankfurt School critical theory, and deconstruction as each relates to questions of political theory.

POL 616: American Electoral Behavior

3.00 Credits

Examines how and why people vote, participate in, and think about politics. Special attention to the most recent election, putting it into the context of political research on previous elections and political attitudes.

POL 618: The Problem of Sovereignty

3.00 Credits

Since the Peace of Westphalia, sovereign states have been the fundamental units of the international system. Yet many argue today that sovereignty is being undermined both from above and below. Globalizing forces of open markets, open societies, and open technologies undermine sovereignty from above. Simultaneously, many sovereign states are under siege or collapsing due to the pressure of ethnic, nationalist, and/or demographic forces from below. Is sovereignty dead, dying, or changing? International law is based upon the concept of sovereignty, yet it was also created to overcome the problems associated with sovereignty. Is sovereignty without limits or responsibilities? The humanitarian crises since the end of the Cold War have caused many voices across the idealogical spectrum to argue that sovereignty must be kept in its place. What does that mean? This course will consider these debates concerning sovereignty: its history, definitions, prospects and limitations, and future evolution.

POL 619A: Civil Society

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 620: Constitutionalism: Ideas and Institutions

3.00 Credits

Considers the nature and function of constitutionalism, and the structuring of political and social relations to compensate for human nature, constrain choice, and institutionalize knowledge, values and practice, with particular reference to the American experience. Topics include political culture, the public-private distinction, political and administrative discretion, federalism and decentralization, and the limits of rationality.

POL 622: Hegel to Nietzsche

3.00 Credits

A review of the political theories of nineteenth-century European political thought with a special emphasis on the continental tradition. Utilizes selected texts from various authors, including Hegel, Proudhon, Marx, Stirner, Bergson, Dilthey, Weber, and Nietzsche. Particular attention to questions of right and the political order. Prerequisite: 652.

POL 624: Graduate Seminar on Congress

3.00 Credits

An in depth look at the major political science literature and research trends on the modern Congress.

POL 625: Graduate: Introduction to American Politics

3.00 Credits

Studies the principal approaches in political science to the organization of American government, with particular emphasis on the Presidency, Congress, political parties, and the Supreme Court.

POL 626: Graduate Constitutional Law

3.00 Credits

An intensive overview of the development of leading constitutional doctrines by the Supreme Court, including federalism and separation of powers, property and privacy rights, the First Amendment and the Equal Protection Clause.

POL 627: Seminar: The American Presidency

3.00 Credits

An intensive review of the major literature on the U.S. presidency including Skowronek on political development, Tulis on the rhetorical presidency, Barber on presidential character, Jones on separation of powers, McDonald on historical development, and Burke on institutionalization of the executive.

POL 628: United States Military Interventions

3.00 Credits

An examination of United States military interventions, deployments, and humanitarian interventions. When is the use of force effective, necessary, justifiable?

POL 629: Separation of Powers

3.00 Credits

The focus of this seminar is on constitutional conflicts among the branches of the national government. Topics to be examined are: presidential war powers and foreign policy, covert operations, executive orders, presidential signing statements, executive privilege, budgetary control, independent regulatory commissions, among others.

POL 630: Seminar: American Political Development

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 631: Theories of International Politics

3.00 Credits

An analysis of the impact of modern thought upon international relations theory. Examines concepts such as the level of analysis problem, international systems theory, political realism, and liberal institutionalism, within the framework of the history of the twentieth century and the evolution of international politics as a specialized subfield of political science.

POL 632: Foreign Policy Decision Making

3.00 Credits

Conceptions of decision making, bargaining theory, incrementalism, organizational theory, bureaucratic politics, crisis management, and cognitive processing.

POL 633: Electoral Politics in Russia

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 634: Research Design: Strategies and Skills

3.00 Credits

A basic course in research design for theoretical political analysis. Explores a variety of methodological approaches. Formerly titled "Theory Construction and Research Design."

POL 635: Statistical Methods

3.00 Credits

A graduate-level introduction to basic statistical methods and research design. The course is designed for those planning to use quantitative methods in their research, or who wish to better evaluate statistical studies in political science. Topics include sampling, probability theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, and bivariate and multivariate statistics.

POL 636: History of the Presidency

3.00 Credits

An intensive review of the major literature on the U.S. presidency including Skowronek on political development, Tulis on the rhetorical presidency, Barber on presidential character, Jones on separation of powers, McDonald on historical development, and Burke on institutionalization of the executive.

POL 637: Social Movements in World Politics

3.00 Credits

This course examines the role of social and transnational movements in world politics. The course explores a variety of approaches to contentious politics, but gives particular attention to social movement theories and their application in the field of international relations. We will also study the impact of social/transnational movements on foreign policy and global issues such as human rights.

POL 638: Asian Security

3.00 Credits

What are the ordering principles underlying international relations in Asia? Do existing theories of international relations help us understand the sources of conflict and cooperation in this region? This seminar analyzes various strands of international relations theory in the context of Asia. Although emphasis will be placed on East Asia, the course also raises important security issues pertinent to Southeast and South Asia.

POL 639: Qualitative Research Methods

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 640: East Asian Regionalism in Comparative Pol

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 641: Contemporary Theories and Research in Comparative Politics

3.00 Credits

An advanced survey of the major topics and important research traditions in comparative politics, with emphasis on theory and research design.

POL 642: French Liberal Thought and Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 643: Modern Christian Political Thought

3.00 Credits

Beginning with the Renaissance and Reformation and continuing up to the present, this course will explore the relationship of Christianity with the modern world. In contrast with the medieval notion of Christendom, modern civilization has come to understand itself in terms of the secular energies it unleashed. This has made for an uneasy relationship. On the one hand, separation and even hostility to the Church, have been announced, but on the other, the inability of a purely secular account to sustain itself has also been acknowledged. The political crises and their stabilization, along with the centrality of human dignity and rights, will be examined within that framework.

POL 644: Modern Christian Political Thought

3.00 Credits

A study of writings by leading twentieth-century Christian thinkers on politically significant problems, including the social and moral obligation of the modern state, the relationship between man and the state, the good political order, types of political representation, and the relationship between Church/churches and political society.

POL 645: Classical Political Thought

3.00 Credits

Examines one or more basic texts of ancient political thought, such as Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Politics, or Aristotle's Ethics. Explores ancient alternative to modern political theory.

POL 646: Research Methods in Political Science

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 651: Political Theory I

3.00 Credits

Examines fundamental issues of politics with special reference to seminal thinkers from Plato to modern times. Part I gives particular attention to Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, and Machiavelli.

POL 652: Political Theory II

3.00 Credits

Examines fundamental issues of politics with special reference to seminal thinkers from Plato to modern times. Part II emphasizes such figures as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, and Marx. These courses can be taken separately but are structured to be taken in sequence. Particularly students without background in political theory are advised against taking them out of sequence. Required for students in the Ph. D program.

POL 653: Marx and Political Theory

3.00 Credits

Reviews Marx's basic texts and surveys a broad range of secondary literature concerned with questions of Marxism and political theory. Secondary authors include Lukacs, Berlin, Bottommore, Althusser, Sartre, Adorno, and others.

POL 659: Ideas and Identity in International Relations

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 660: Seminar in International Conflict Resolution

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 662: Interdisciplinary Empirical Theory and World Politics

3.00 Credits

A critical assessment of the origins, content, and significance of the scientific study of world politics. In addition to examining the principal behavioral approaches to international relations, introduces the policy student to a variety of theorists whose approaches may be relevant to the understanding of world politics. Prerequisites: 631, 634, or Permission of Instructor.

POL 663: The Cold War and Soviet Archives

3.00 Credits

An examination of Soviet foreign policy during the Cold War based on Russian archival materials released after the breakup of the USSR. Emphasis on the roles of revolutionary ideology and power politics in Soviet international conduct.

POL 664: Transatlantic Security

3.00 Credits

Formerly POL 534. The changing definitions and requirements of security in the aftermath of the Cold War, including environmental security and economic security; the relationship between security and democracy; the role of nuclear weapons in the post-Cold War world; weapons proliferation; arms control; ethnic, nationalist, and regional conflicts; conflict resolution methods; post-Cold War force structures appropriate to the changing nature of threats to security; collective security; and prognoses for the future.

POL 665: Security in the Information Age

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 666: Environment and Development in the Americas

3.00 Credits

Considers how economic development, and the policies that support it, affects the environment, both in the United States and Latin America. The course surveys a variety of environmental issues, with special attention to citizen action to address them. Topics may include recent efforts to combat the degradation of the Chesapeake Bay and other restoration projects, the politics of energy and the impact of alternative energy and transportation choices on the environment, grassroots responses to hazardous waste issues, community managed resource exploitation, and urban planning.

POL 672: Politics and Culture in France and the United States

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 673: International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

A survey of major theoretical efforts to relate economic and political behavior. Outstanding policy issues in world political economy. Atlantic relations and North-South issues addressed. The utility of theoretical contributions weighed in the light of historical evidence and contemporary policy trends.

POL 674: Topics in International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

Includes the political environment of multinational corporate activities, international trade policies, the politics of monetary relations, future world order models.

POL 678: Environmental Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 680: Seminar on Latin American Politics

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 681: Graduate Survey American Political Thought

3.00 Credits

Relates developments in political theory to the institutional arrangements characteristic of different periods of American political history.

POL 690: After the Fall: The Politics of Reconstruction and Reparation in Post-Conflict Societies

3.00 Credits

This course looks at the politics of reconstruction, reparation and reconciliation in the wake of political disaster. Topics include the sorts of political settlements that emerge from such national catastrophes; the roles of international actors in shaping, enforcing and financing those settlements; the vexed questions of retaliation, reconciliation and reparation for the crimes of the past; the distribution of pain and rewards in post-conflict reconstruction; and the roles of state and "civil society" in recovery. Cases for research may include: Afghanistan today; Angola after the defeat of UNITA; Argentina after the generals; Bosnia under the Dayton Accords; Cambodia after the UN-brokered peace accords; Chiles after Pinochet; East Timor at Independence; El Salvador since 1992; Guatemala today; Indonesia after the fall of Soeharto; occupied Iraq; Mozambique after the peace accords; Rwanda after the genocide; Serbia and the breakup of Yugoslavia; and South Africa after apartheid. Students will develop and report on their own research projects centered on one aspect of one or more cases.

POL 692: Masters Directed Readings

3.00 Credits

Staff.

POL 694: Masters Independent Study

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

POL 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

POL 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

POL 701: German Idealism and Its Aftermath

3.00 Credits

German Idealism defined a shift in modern philosophical and political thought that is still being absorbed. The continuity between Hegel and Marx has exemplified the connection with the moderm ideological movements. John Rawl's identification of Kantian morality has confirmed the descent into liberal political thought. Now we have the postmodern recognition of the idealists as the source of their own "metaphysics beyond the metaphysics of presence." No one of these avenues is sufficient to comprehend the rich philosophical profusion that constituted German idealism, an outburst that can well be regarded as the core of the self-understanding of the modern world. This seminar will initiate such a reconsideration through the reading of KAnt, Hegel, Schelling, Kierkegaard, and Nietzche.

POL 702: Seminar:Philosophy and History

3.00 Credits

An examination of the symbolic forms of philosophy and history in their Greek and Hebraic origins, as well as a reflection on the interrelationship between philosophy and history, the problems of meaning in history, and the meaning of history.

POL 703: Seminar: International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

An advanced seminar dealing with issues of theoretical and practical concern.

POL 704: Seminar: International Politics of the Atlantic Relationship

3.00 Credits

Begins with an overview of outstanding issues confronting the NATO allies. Students will prepare seminar papers on an agreed topic for presentation before the completion of the term. Military, political, economic, or technological issues considered as acceptable areas for research.

POL 705: Seminar: Hegel

3.00 Credits

A study of Hegel as the philosophically most competent and historically most knowledgeable of the moderns. Focuses on Hegel's political thought within the context of his whole philosophical system.

POL 706: Seminar: Voegelin

3.00 Credits

Examination of the work of Eric Voegelin, with particular attention to the philosophy of consciousness that forms the basis for his conception of political philosophy.

POL 707: Seminar: Comparative Urban Politics

3.00 Credits

Beginning with an examination of urbanism and modernity grounded in the American political reality, uses the concept of city from its ancient articulation into the present to probe the experience of urbanization in European, Asian, African, and South American countries.

POL 708: Seminar: Political Development

3.00 Credits

An advanced writing seminar on issues in political development, designed to explore contemporary research questions and to enable students to undertake extended research on related topics and present their findings to a knowledgeable audience.

POL 709: Seminar: Topics in International Political Economy

3.00 Credits

Studies of special issues relating to the global political economy. May include a focus on trade, investment development, and major economic trends in the international system.

POL 710: Seminar: Rousseau and Kant

3.00 Credits

Leads students through a reading of Immanuel Kant's philosophy and political writings in the context of a reflection on Rousseau's critique of the Enlightenment.

POL 711: Seminar: The American Presidency

3.00 Credits

A broad overview of the constitutional, historical, and institutional development of the American presidency, and the contributions and leadership styles of individual presidents.

POL 712: Heidegger, Nietzsche and Political Theory

3.00 Credits

Considers Heidegger's and Nietzsche's philosophy from the perspective of political theory.

POL 713: Advanced Topics in Constitutional Design

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 716: Seminar: American Electoral Behavior

3.00 Credits

Examines the voting history of United States presidential elections, including the coalitions that parties have historically assembled. Also studies how parties construct their voting coalitions and how voters respond to these partisan appeals.

POL 718: Advanced Seminar on Aristotle andAugustine

3.00 Credits

Aristotle advocates the political formation of virtue while Augustine reduces the primary task of the state to providing peace. The tension between these politics may illuminate parallel tensions in modern and contemporary political theory. Close reading of the Ethics, the Politics, and the City of God, accompanied by exploration of recent interpretations and uses of these thinkers' insights.

POL 719: Political Thought of the Reformation Tradition

3.00 Credits

Explores the tradition of political thinking connected to the theology of the Protestant Reformation. Beginning with St. Paul and Augustine, traces this expression in Luther, Calvin, and European Anabaptism; follows its development in Winthrop, Penn, Williams, and Wesley; and considers its modern extension in figures like Kuyper, Dooyeweerd, Niebuhr, and Ellul. Considers the relation of this tradition to contemporary spokesmen for Protestant political thought and activism.

POL 720: Seminar: Historicism

3.00 Credits

The historical nature of politics and civilization. Universality and particularity. Individuality and creativity. Concrete experience as normative. Political morality. Universality as evolving. The flight from history.The possibility of value-centered historicism.

POL 721: Seminar: Third World Development

3.00 Credits

An advanced writing seminar on the problems of and prospects for Third World political, economic, and social development, designed to enable graduate students to undertake extended research on related topics and to present their findings to a knowledgeable audience.

POL 722: Seminar: Irving Babbitt

3.00 Credits

A critical assessment of the ideas of Irving Babbitt and their relevance for the political and cultural problems of modern civilization.

POL 723: Seminar: Politics and the Imagination

3.00 Credits

Defines and assesses the role of the imagination in shaping political thought and action. Political implications of literature and art. Relates types of imagination to types of character and society. The imagination and the historical sense. Escapism. Considers works of political philosophy, fiction, poetry, and other art.

POL 724: Seminar: Russia, New/Old Europe, United States of America

3.00 Credits

This seminar reviews the post-Cold War politics of the Eastern half of Europe as well as contending European and American views of transatlantic relations and contemporary world politics. It requires independent research projects on topics related to interactions among Russia, the East and West European states, and the United States of America.

POL 726: Advanced Topics in Constitutionalism and Public Law

3.00 Credits

An in-depth study of selected topics in constitutional law, theory, interpretation, and institutions.

POL 736: Seminar: International Politics

3.00 Credits

Primarily concerned with the security dilemma, its impact on national policies, and efforts to escape from the constraints that it imposes. Special attention to preventive and pre-emptive war, methods of fostering cooperation, and the impact of institutions on international relations. Formerly titled "National Security and International Security."

POL 737: Seminar: Historicity and Ethics of Politics

3.00 Credits

Does the emphasis on the historical nature of human existence, as in Burke, Hegel, Croce, and later historicists, undermine the notion of moral universality? If there are universal "values" or "principles," do we need to heed history and tradition? The seminar reconsiders the meaning of "universality" and "transcendence," exploring the possibility of synthesis as well as tension between universality and particularity. The implications for political morality are examined with particular reference to Platonic "idealism," Machiavellian "realism," and the distinction between the things of God and the things of Caesar.

POL 740: Varieties of Capitalism

3.00 Credits

The Varieties of Capitalism thesis contends that capitalism varies across countries in ways similar to democracy or federalism. Capitalism rests on legal and cultural foundations that vary according to a countrys political, social, and economic history. Some proponents of this thesis contend that economic globalization is eroding these varieties of capitalism and leading toward the convergence around the neo-liberalism. This course examines the argument and explores its validity.

POL 753: Seminar: Heidegger

3.00 Credits

An in-depth examination of a major thinker, trend, or concept in the development of political thought. Political Theory.

POL 756: Political Theory of Nietzsche

3.00 Credits

Devoted to close reading of Nietzsche's work. Basic Nietzschean themes--such as will to power, eternal recurrence, death of God, and overman--are explored for their significance for questions regarding order and authority, freedom and meaning, history and polity. Recommended: Some familiarity with contemporary Continental thought and some proficiency in reading German.

POL 762: Seminar:Religion and the American Founding

3.00 Credits

How does religion properly figure in the constitutional framework of the American republic? This seminar equips students to assess competing answers to this question via historical, structural and theoretical analysis.

POL 786: Seminar: Russia, Europe and World

3.00 Credits

Research problems related to the domestic politics and foreign policy of post-Communist Russia and post-Cold War Europe.

POL 807: Habermas Seminar

3.00 Credits

no description available

POL 992: Doctoral Directed Reading

3.00 Credits

Staff.

POL 994: Doctoral Independent Study

3.00 Credits

Staff.

POL 996: Doctoral Dissertation Research

0 Credits

This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

POL 998A: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

POL 998B: Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.