The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Politics: Off-Campus (CPOL)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

CPOL 500: Introduction to International Affairs

3.00 Credits

Required of all new students. Designed to acquaint the student with the recent history of International Affairs, principal subfields in the discipline, major theoretical and methodological debates in the study of world politics, and the importance of proposing parsimonious hypotheses in testing the theories.

CPOL 501: Globalization

3.00 Credits

This course considers the heated debates over Globalization. What is it? Is it desirable or devastating? Is economics overshadowing politics, or is globalization just an updated form of imperialism? Is globalization inevitable? What impact does globalization have on politics and the state, on economics, the environment, human rights, labor, culture, borders, security, and policy? How do local government and politics fit into a global age, and where do political accountability and authority lie? Is the state withering away? What will the future institutions of governance look like? Is foreign policy dead, because it is no longer "foreign?"

CPOL 503: American Political Ideologies

3.00 Credits

What do the labels mean - conservative, liberal, facist, communist? Designed for Congressional Studies students, this course surveys American political ideologies from the American Revolution to the present. In the early years of the republic, special attention is paid to classical liberalism, capitalism, and nationalism. In the 19th century, the focus embraces pro- and anti- slavery movements, nativism, social Darwinism, utopian movement, socialism, anarchism, and religious movements. In the 20th century, attention is given to populism, progressivism, New Deal liberalism, communism, fascism, conservatism, environmentalism, religious fundamentalism, secularism, feminism, the gay rights movement, libertarianism, and neo-conservatism.

CPOL 505: Congress & Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

An examination of the legislative role in the conduct of United States foreign policy, focusing on Congress' powers, including consideration of treaties, nominations, appropriations, and oversight. Course includes focused discussions of war powers, use of intelligence and politicization of foreign policy. Topic is developed in part through case studies and historical examples. American Government / World Politics

CPOL 513: International Politics of Food and Hunger

3.00 Credits

This course will examine where the United States stands in its bipartisan commitment to end hunger and poverty in the world. It will look at the institutions charged with this responsibility and will analyze why individuals should be similarly engaged. Among other questions it will explore the root causes of both global and domestic hunger and will review the policy responses likely to be most effective toward the objective of ending hunger in our time.

CPOL 514: Terrorism and National Security

3.00 Credits

Analyzes the impact of terrorism on national security policy by systematically profiling the terrorist problem, to include future forms of violence. Identifies key attributes and principles of a counterterrorist program by synthesizing and codifying lessons from the experiences of other countries. Concludes by focusing on United States policies and the responsibilities of major commanders in coping with terrorism in their areas of responsibility.

CPOL 518: Politics Peoples Republic of China

3.00 Credits

This course examines political institutions and policies of the PRC, with particular attention to the political tensions that continue to define the regime as it pursues economic liberalization with authoritarian government. Among the topics covered are the historic background of the Chinese revolution, the coming of the Chinese Communist Party to power, and major political institutions such as the Communist Party, party government, and the People's Liberation Army. Policy issues include foreign policy, especially Sino-American relationships, economic policy, and defense issues.

CPOL 519: Politics of East Asia

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 523: Cyber Warfare Strategy and Policy

3.00 Credits

This course addresses the emerging international relations, policy, doctrine, strategy and operational issues associated with Computer Network Attack (CAN) and Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) ' collectively known as cyber warfare. Students will gain an understanding of the evolution of cyber warfare and the basic characteristics and methods of CAN and CNE; the current national policies and strategies relative to cyber warfare; and the potential impact of cyber warfare on future conflicts.

CPOL 524: The War on Terrorism

3.00 Credits

In response to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001, the President and Congress have declared a war on terrorism. This class will examine this "new kind of war." The course will address the rising power of non state actors and trans sovereign threats in a period of globalization; the political, economic, and military policy options available to combat terrorism, and the effectiveness of these options; "smart security" models from other countries and the private sector for increasing security without sacrificing civil liberties; and the institutional challenges posed by the underside of globalization.

CPOL 525: The Just War

3.00 Credits

Examines attempts to construct a moral code governing the use of force in international politics, including discussion of the theory of aggression (jus ad bellum), the war convention (jus in bello), and the particular dilemma of nuclear deterrence.

CPOL 527: Religion and International Politics

3.00 Credits

This course provides a survey of the interplay of religion on a variety of worldwide political issues, including terrorism, war and peace, the economy, globalization, national identity, and the environment. The role of Catholicism and other religious bodies will be examined, with consideration of religion's role for good or bad in conflict situations, such as in the Middle East, as well as its influence on US foreign policy. This is primarily a lecture course, but students also participate in course discussions.

CPOL 529: Liberalism and Its Critics

3.00 Credits

Explores the problems of modern liberalism through the writings of its critics and defenders. Special attention to the central dilemma of contemporary liberal pluralism: the tendency to undermine the moral and philosophical foundations on which respect for individual rights is based.

CPOL 530: Perspectives on North Korea

3.00 Credits

This course will facilitate an in-depth exploration of the debates and security concerns relating to North Korea. The course will discuss North Korea's past, present, and future by applying insights from various theories of international relations and comparative politics. By the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the theoretical origins and/or implications of contemporary debates over the challenge that North Korea poses to the United States and the international community. Three themes in particular are emphasized: perceptions and identity; traditional security challenges; and human security.

CPOL 531: Congressional Budget

3.00 Credits

The procedure and politics of the budgetary and appropriations processes in the Congress. Relationship to public policy and electoral politics. Roles of congressional committees, leadership, and staff.

CPOL 532: Congressional Committees

3.00 Credits

History of the congressional committee system. Functions of congressional committees, including policy development, administrative oversight, investigation, public information, and legislative powersharing. Committee staffing as a political process.

CPOL 535: International Law of Armed Conflict

3.00 Credits

International Law of Armed Conflict International Law of Armed Conflict investigates the principles of international law regulating the use of force in international society. The course is designed to examine the permissibility of using force and the law governing the conduct of hostilities. The course looks in detail at the right of self-defense and anticipatory self-defense, the role of the UN, humanitarian intervention, self-determination, reprisals and intervention in civil war. Discussions will also include the right to participate in hostilities, the law of weaponry including weapons of mass destruction, the protection of civilians, rules for occupation, classification of those captured on the battlefield, and rules of engagement. Significant attention will be given to developments arising from the Global War on Terrorism and from coalition activities in Afghanistan and Iraq.

CPOL 537: Political Economics and International Politics

3.00 Credits

A survey of major theoretical efforts to relate economic and political behavior. Outstanding policy issues in world political economy. Considers Atlantic relations and North-South issues. Weighs the utility of theoretical contributions in light of historical evidence and contemporary policy trends.

CPOL 538: Contemporary Middle East I

3.00 Credits

Assesses factors influencing the domestic and foreign policy issues of contemporary Middle Eastern states. On the domestic level, students will be introduced to major themes and institutions--history, religion, ideology, social setup, the military and security apparatuses, and economic resources- which have shaped the ruling styles and regimes in the region. We will pay particular attention to the pervasiveness of authoritarianism, potential for political reform, and internal security challenges. Case-study emphasis will be given to the states of North Africa (Egypt, Algeria), the Levant (Lebanon, Syria), and the Gulf (Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia). On the international level, we will explore regional trends in interstate conflict, peacemaking and diplomacy, and implications for U.S. policy. Emphasis will be given to the Cold War, Arab-Israeli conflict, as well as more contemporary issues such as non-state actors, and arms control.

CPOL 539: Contemporary Middle East II

3.00 Credits

An examination of patterns of violence and competition in the Middle East which focuses on internal, regional and global conflicts and the relationships among them.

CPOL 540: International Organization and Law

3.00 Credits

International organizations have become one of the principal means by which states engage one another in dealing with disputes, common problems, and international order. This course will look at the development of international organizations, especially the United Nations, and explore their potential for generating order within the anarchic relationships of states. One of the principal means available for the establishment of order is international law, either in the form of treaties, international agreements and conventions, and charter documents for international organizations. This course will examine the central role played by organizations and law within the international arena. Particular reference will be made to the problems that require a global solution as well as the universality of human rights.

CPOL 542: Security Politics of the Korean Peninsula

3.00 Credits

What factors influence the foreign policies of North and South Korea? Why do they remain divided, and why does the United States maintain a military alliance with South Korea? How do politics on the Korean Peninsula affect the East Asian security environment and vice versa? This course undertakes an examination of these questions and others as a way of understanding North and South Korean security behavior and how it impacts regional and U.S. security. The course will review the domestic political circumstances of North and South Korea, their respective security concerns, and the factors most likely to determine if the Korean Peninsula will remain at peace or erupt into war once again.

CPOL 543: National Security Law

3.00 Credits

Survey and analysis of the legislative basis of United States national security policy making, with special emphasis on the legal authority and responsibility of individuals involved in the policy process. Topics include separation of powers, security assistance an covert action, collection and dissemination of national security information, international arrangements, and current issues such as nonproliferation, terrorism and counter narcotic and economic intelligence.

CPOL 544: Special Topics

3.00 Credits

Offered from time to time as warranted by the availability of expert faculty, the special needs of students, or special interest in the light of current developments, for example, military aspects of refugee policy. International Affairs. Staff.

CPOL 545: Pacific Rim Relations

3.00 Credits

Evolution of political and economic relations among selected Pacific Rim states. The role of the United States as a Pacific power. Competitions and collaborations among major Pacific Rim nations.

CPOL 546: Intelligence and World Politics

3.00 Credits

This course examines the US Intelligence Community and its role in national security. It covers the intelligence cycle (planning and direction, collection, processing, analysis, and dissemination) while focusing on key topics such as warning and surprise; denial and deception; covert action; oversight and civil liberties; the role of policymakers; and intelligence reform. For perspective, the organization and activities of intelligence services in select foreign countries will be compared to the US model.

CPOL 547: Nationbuilding

3.00 Credits

Nation-building, according to James Dobbins, is "the use of armed force in the aftermath of a conflict to underpin an enduring transition to democracy" and "the inescapable responsibility of the world's only superpower." This course introduces the wide range of theoretical and practical issues in nation-building. It considers historical and current cases, informed by scholarly analysis and first-person accounts.

CPOL 548: International Politics of East and Southeast Asia

3.00 Credits

Provides a broad overview of developments in East Asia, with particular emphasis on China, Japan, Korea and selected Southeast Asian nations. Examines domestic and foreign policies of these countries and assesses implications of United States and Russian policies in the region.

CPOL 549: Politics of Latin America

3.00 Credits

Latin America is increasingly an area of focus for U.S. political and economic relationships. This course provides an overview of the region with particular attention to the challenges and contributions of American foreign policy. Topics covered include the relationship between political and economic development and the political stability and instability of democratic institutions; international politics of the states of the region; and the role of institutions of "civil society" in the political life of the region. Assessment of the role of the military, the Church, labor movements, and guerrilla groups are of particular interest.

CPOL 551: Africa and U.S. National Security Interests

3.00 Credits

Examines the impact of Africa's history, culture, and geography on key political and economic patterns today. Addresses the causes of conflict and the rise of terrorism as a major security issue. Assesses U.S. interests in Africa; the region's changing place in overall American foreign policy; instruments of power; the role of other outside actors (governmental and non-governmental as well as international organizations); peacekeeping operations; and U.S. policy options.

CPOL 553: Violent Non-State Actors

3.00 Credits

Though violent non-state actors (VNSAs) have only recently become the subject of sustained scholarly interest, they are increasingly important international actors. This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical, contextual, and practical understanding of this phenomenon. Though the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, dramatically asserted VNSAs as actors capable of challenging the world's most powerful states on a strategic level, the U.S.'s initial understanding of the threat it confronted'and hence, its reaction'had important limitations. This course examines the U.S.'s confrontation with al-Qaeda, but it will neither exclusively nor primarily focus on al-Qaeda and other jihadist organizations. By exploring a range of VNSAs, the course identifies commonalities and differences among them in terms of ideologies, recruitment processes, organizational structure, strategies, tactics, strengths, vulnerabilities, and what kind of toolkit can be used in confronting VNSAs in the future.

CPOL 557: Parliamentary Procedures in Congress

3.00 Credits

Rules and practices of Congress in considering legislation. Institutional role of the Speaker of the House and the Senate President Pro Tempore. Rules governing member conduct, floor debate, committee action, including specialized rules governing appropriations and budget process. Strategic and tactical uses of parliamentary procedures.

CPOL 558: Just Peace

3.00 Credits

When wars end, how do polities resolve issues of justice related to the conflict while building post-war peace? Examines war crimes tribunals, truth commissions, amnesty, and other ways polities balance issues of justice with other needs in ending conflicts. Considers both internal and international wars.

CPOL 559: Media and Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

To what extent does media influence foreign policy, and to what extent are governments able to manipulate media coverage of foreign policy? How do governments deal with media coverage of foreign policy and how effective are various media strategies? Examines these and other issues through case studies, with a primary focus on United States foreign policy.

CPOL 560: Issues in United States Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

The end of the Cold War has brought a resurgence of debate over U.S. foreign policy. The opening of societies, of economies, and of technologies present new challenges. Course begins with an examination of debates on current foreign policy issues, turning to a regional focus to see how the issues develop in foreign policy toward particular regions.

CPOL 563: Politics of Post-Soviet Russia

3.00 Credits

An examination of Russian political and economic development and foreign policy under Gorbachev, Yeltsin, and Putin.

CPOL 565: Executive Branch Policy-Making

3.00 Credits

Examines the roles of the President, the Cabinet departments, White House staff and Executive Office agencies in making foreign and domestic policy, with emphasis on the former. Special attention to the organization and management of policy making processes in the Executive Branch. Congressional Studies.

CPOL 567: Arms Control, Disarmament and Non-Proliferation

3.00 Credits

Countering the threat of weapons of mass destruction from hostile state and non-state actors is a preeminent national security priority and a key element of President Obama's national security strategy. This course explores the complex dangers of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and the array of nonproliferation and arms control tools for addressing them. The future of nuclear weapons policies of the United States, Russia, and other nuclear weapons states, and their role in international security affairs, will be examined. The nuclear arms control experience will also be studied, comparing theory and practice, and assessing current arms control agreements and new initiatives from the Obama administration will also be explored. The course will also address core questions such as: What incentives drive WMD proliferation and what global and United States strategies are in place to reduce these incentives? How has the WMD threat changed our thinking about deterrence and can terrorist groups such as al Qaeda be deterred? What are the challenges in building relationships with WMD-armed opponents? The course will also explore efforts to tackle new challenges presented by Iran, North Korea, India and Pakistan, and the AQ Khan proliferation network.

CPOL 569: The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in Historical and Regional Perspective

3.00 Credits

This course will trace the development of the conflict from the 19th century to the present, emphasizing the historical narratives of both sides in addition to employing standard histories. We will also focus on the role of regional and non-regional actors and examine different theories as to why the conflict has been so intractable and what caused the failure of the peace process of the 1990's.

CPOL 574: European Integration and Security

3.00 Credits

Examines institutional and economic aspects of European integration, and European Union expansion. Focuses on dilemmas of shared sovereignty and common security.

CPOL 574A: Nation Building

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 575: Program and Policy Evaluation

3.00 Credits

Evaluation is an activity directed at collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating information about the effectiveness of programs and policies. Evaluation in the contemporary context of international affairs is conducted to aid decision-makers and to assess the utility of program and policies. This course will instruct students how to apply research techniques to evaluate programs and policies. It examines different evaluation techniques with an emphasis on foreign policy, international development policies, and institutional analysis.

CPOL 576: Ethics and Public Policy

3.00 Credits

Examines the major ethical topics within contemporary politics, including capital punishment, just war, nuclear deterrence, world justice, affirmative action, abortion, and control of biomedical technology.

CPOL 577: Political Theory of American Framing

3.00 Credits

Considers the political theory of the origins of the United States Constitution and its implementation in the American government. Readings include The Federalist, various writings of the Anti-Federalists, writings of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, excerpts from the records of the Constitutional convention, as well as major secondary sources.

CPOL 579: Iran and Iraq

3.00 Credits

Iran and Iraq have always been key countries in the Middle East, and American foreign policy in the region has been strongly influenced by developments in these two states. Likewise, US relations with the other countries of the Gulf region have also been strongly influenced by conditions in Iran and Iraq. To illuminate the factors that shape internal developments in these two countries, their relationships with each other, and how they fit into the broader regional context, this class will consider both recent developments and broader historic trends. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the social, political, and religious factors that have shaped these states, with particular attention to their influence on regime stability, instability and political transition. The course will also address contemporary issues such as constitutional reform, sectarianism/factionalism, cross border influences, the use of external proxies, military competition, and the influence of external powers on Iran, Iraq and the broader Gulf.

CPOL 580: Germany & The EU

3.00 Credits

Germany and the EU: What's Next? The future of Europe and the European Union (EU) continues to challenge, as recent difficulties with immigration and membership, such as British withdrawal, reveal. At the same time, the relationship between Europe and the United States is no longer what it has been. The key member here is a unified Germany, particularly in view of its economic and financial strength. This course includes special focus on Germany, notably its government and its important role in the international scene. Attention is given to developments in Germany's political and security policies. The overall outlook for the EU, including its foreign and security role in conjunction with NATO, likewise is examined.

CPOL 582: Complex Operations: Planning and Management

3.00 Credits

Weak states, failing states, countries in conflict and in post-conflict situations, states devastated by catastrophic events, and ones with transitioning economies present challenges and opportunities for those seeking to promote stability, accountability and predictability in the globalized world of the 21st century. States such as Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, and Yemen pose unique and individual challenges as they struggle with internal division, economic development and terrorism. This course will explore the relationship between states, localities and the international community in conflict and post-conflict reconstruction. Among the topics explored will be how to organize, prioritize, plan and execute complex operations and the role of leadership, creative operations planning, special operations, and joint civil-military operations in promoting rule of law, stabilization, and reconstruction.

CPOL 584: International Policies of Central Asia States

3.00 Credits

Survey focuses on the five states of Kasakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, examining their ties with each other, the Confederation of Independent States, the Islamic world, and the West. Analyzes their foreign and domestic policies, particularly in the fields of human rights, nuclear arms, and drug trafficking. Assesses their future importance for the region and the world.

CPOL 594: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

International Affairs and Congressional Studies. Staff.

CPOL 595A: Congressional Internship

3.00 Credits

A combination of lectures, discussions, and internships arranged for students in congressional offices and committees.

CPOL 595B: Congressional Internship (Leeds)

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 595C: Washington Internship

3.00 Credits

The Washington Internship is a seminar offered in conjunction with an approved internship which is typically 12-15 hours at the site each week. Students write descriptive, analytical and reflective essays and present progress reports regarding their internships which assess managerial problems and dilemma solving techniques, policy issues and conventional explanations in light of the practices and rationales observed at the internship.

CPOL 595D: Washington Internship (Leeds)

6.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 595E: Stonehill Internship

6.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 598: Insurgency and Revolution

3.00 Credits

Provides an overview of the theoretical literature concerning the causes of insurgencies and revolutions. Assesses several case studies of insurgent and revolutionary movements. Formerly offered as 592.

CPOL 601: Legislative Roles of the Executive Branch

3.00 Credits

The course will explore how the Executive Branch interacts with the Congress in the following areas-development of legislative proposals; coordination of positions on legislation, including testimony and floor positions; the President's Budget; regulations; and executive orders.

CPOL 602: The Legislative Presidency

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the constitutional, institutional, and personal aspects of the modern presidency. It will emphasize the roles of contemporary Presidents in all aspects of the legislative process and the resources available to advance the President's legislative program.

CPOL 604: Transatlantic Security

3.00 Credits

The purpose of the course is to help students develop a better understanding of transatlantic security institutions, actors, and processes (e.g. NATO, EU-related, and bilateral arrangements). In addition, course analysis and debate will focus on prominent issues of contention and areas of cooperation, as well as strategic cultures (informed by history, government structures, and political cultures) on both sides of the Atlantic.

CPOL 605: Separation of Powers

3.00 Credits

The focus of this seminar is on constitutional conflicts among the branches of the national government. Topics to be examined are: presidential war powers and foreign policy, covert operations, executive orders, presidential signing statements, executive privilege, budgetary control, independent regulatory commissions, among others.

CPOL 606: American Politics and the Media

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 610: Executive Privilege and Presidential Power

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 613: Law and Politics of Homeland Security

3.00 Credits

This course covers the legal and political aspects of defending the US homeland. Among the topics covered will be the use of the military, law enforcement, and the intelligence communities in homeland defense. It will explore, among other things, the Posse Comitatus Act, border and port security, use and restrictions of US person-centric data bases, efforts to combat domestic terrorism, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), and the USA Patriot Act. Particular emphasis will be on the interaction between the need to preserve civil liberties while effectively defending against the terrorist threat coupled with the prospect of terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction.

CPOL 614: Institutional Development of the Senate

3.00 Credits

The course will explore the institutional development of the Senate by examining changes in its external environment, as well as internal structures, procedures, and normative culture. It will examine how developments in each of these areas interacted to precipitate institutional change from a loosely organized chamber to a decentralized body dominated by its standing committees and their chairmen, to an ultimately more centralized body in which party leadership plays a larger role.

CPOL 615: American Political Development

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 617: Warfare and World Politics

3.00 Credits

This course examines war as a political and social phenomenon and as a force in world politics. Major themes include: the development of leading ideas about war; the mutual interactions of politics, society, and warfare; the impact of military doctrine on warfare; allocation of resources and coordination of effort among land, sea, and air forces; and the implications of national strategic cultures on the conduct of war in the modern era.

CPOL 618: The Problem of Sovereignty

3.00 Credits

Since the Peace of Westphalia, sovereign states have been the fundamental units of the international system. Yet many argue today that sovereignty is being undermined both from above and below. Globalizing forces of open markets, open societies, and open technologies undermine sovereignty from above. Simultaneously, many sovereign states are under siege or collapsing due to the pressure of ethnic, nationalist, and/or demographic forces from below. Is sovereignty dead, dying, or changing? International law is based upon the concept of sovereignty, yet it was also created to overcome the problems associated with sovereignty. Is sovereignty without limits or responsibilities? The humanitarian crises since the end of the Cold War have caused many voices across the ideological spectrum to argue that sovereignty must be kept in its place. What does that mean? This course will consider these debates concerning sovereignty: its history, definitions, prospects and limitations, and future evolution. World Politics.

CPOL 623: Congress, the President and Foreign Policy

3.00 Credits

The course examines congressional activism and acquiescence in U.S. foreign policy. Constitutional concepts will be explored through recent cases (Helms-Burton, NAFTA, War Powers and Lebanon, debate over the 1997 ABM Treaty-related agreements, and U.S. funding for the United Nations). Issues such as the influence of interest groups and bipartisan collaboration and conflict in foreign policy will be debated.

CPOL 624: Security in the Information Age

3.00 Credits

The information revolution changes the practice and conception of national security in a number of ways. This class will examine the debates over cyberwarfare, cybersecurity, cyberterrorism, cybercrime, national infrastructure protection, media and foreign policy, organizations and information technology. How are our ideas and organizations changing (or not) to deal with the new security environment of a globalizing, IT-rich world?

CPOL 626: The Modern Presidency

3.00 Credits

This course examines the institutional and political developments that have helped shape the modern presidency. In particular, the course examines the shifts in the nomination process and electoral landscape that have influenced the policies pursued by presidents, the development of and enlarged presidential bureaucracy (including an expanded Cabinet and Executive Office of the President), the making of domestic and foreign policy, the relationship between the president, Congress, and Supreme Court, and how these transformations have intertwined to reconfigure the presidency in the twenty-first century.

CPOL 632: Parties and Leaders in the U.S. Congress

3.00 Credits

Examines the theory, development, and behavior of parties in Congress, with a particular focus on party leadership. Topics include theories of political parties and leaders, the goals and strategies of majority and minority parties in Congress, and the selection and behavior of party leaders.

CPOL 635: American Foreign Policy: Institutions and Issues

3.00 Credits

This course is an overview of the American foreign policy process. The first portion of the course investigates the actors and processes involved in the making of foreign policy. In this section of the course, we will ask and answer questions such as how is the president influenced by public opinion? How do different entities within the intelligence community work together? When are interest groups able to influence foreign policy? The second portion examines how foreign policy actors address select topics'ranging from environmental policy to terrorism to global health issues'in foreign policy. The goal of the course is to reach a better understanding of the pitfalls of making foreign policy. How do institutional arrangements complicate the policy process and, similarly, how do particular issue areas challenge decision makers?

CPOL 644: National Security Decision-Making

3.00 Credits

This course will examine the roles of the President, the Cabinet departments, and Executive Office Agencies, (with special emphasis on the National Security Council and CIA), in the formulation and implementation of foreign and national security policy. Special attention will be focused on the impact of White House organization and policy-making processes in shaping decisions. The course will begin with an historical overview of the role of the President and Congress in the realm of foreign and national security policy. Case studies will include the Korean War under Truman, the Bay of Pigs and early Vietnam decisions of the Kennedy years as well as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the major decisions on intervention and non-intervention in Vietnam of the Eisenhower and Johnson years, Operation Desert Storm under George Bush, the intelligence failures leading up to Pearl Harbor and 9/11, and the pre-war intelligence and Bush administration decisionmaking regarding the intervention in Iraq in 2003.

CPOL 650: Seminar on United States Political Leadership

3.00 Credits

An in-depth look at the political leadership of such notables as George Washington, John Marshall, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Ronald Reagan.

CPOL 652: Political Theory II

3.00 Credits

Examines fundamental issues of politics with special reference to seminal thinkers from Plato to modern times. Part II emphasizes such figures as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, and Marx. These courses can be taken separately but are structured to be taken in sequence. Particularly students without background in political theory are advised against taking them out of sequence. Required for students in the Ph.D. program.

CPOL 661: Media and American Politics

3.00 Credits

'In this age of the 24-hour news cycle, the course explores in a seminar setting the use of all forms of media including social networking and the key roles they play in influencing the vast political and policy agenda with an emphasis on the relationship between the President and Congress.

CPOL 666: Executive and Legislative Leadership

3.00 Credits

Focuses on the historical, psychological, and biographical perspectives of political leadership in the United States, with special attention to the Presidency and Congress, Using a broad historical sweep, examines several prominent American political leaders in relation to issues of personality, leadership skill, institutional setting and the historical challenges of the era.

CPOL 670: Origins and Development of Congress

3.00 Credits

The historical, philosophical, constitutional, and political origins of the United States Congress. Institutional and organizational development throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Significant developments in leadership and political party roles.

CPOL 671: The Modern Congress

3.00 Credits

The shaping of the present-day Congress as a representative and legislative institution. Trends in organization, procedure, personnel, and political behavior. Major reform movements. Major institutional problems of the contemporary Congress.

CPOL 672: Congress and the Presidency

3.00 Credits

Examines the historical relationship between the congressional and executive branches. Particular attention to constitutional separation of powers and their execution in an era of divided government.

CPOL 673: Congress and the Supreme Court

3.00 Credits

Covers the constitutional powers of Congress, and the limits on those powers as interpreted by the Supreme Court. Emphasizes issues of the legitimacy and capacity of the Court to act as a check upon the Congress, and Congressional influence on the Court, including the nominee confirmation process.

CPOL 674: Congressional Parties and Elections

3.00 Credits

The past and present roles of political parties in the Congress, including their functions in choosing leaders, organizing the institution, setting public agendas, electing and socializing members, and interacting with the other branches of the federal government.

CPOL 675: Interest Groups and Congressional Lobbying

3.00 Credits

The nature and structure of interest groups and associations. The resources and techniques of lobbies and lobbyists. Regulation of lobbying, including a survey of relevant statutes and court cases. The perspective of the members of Congress.

CPOL 676: The Policy Process in Congress

3.00 Credits

Major concepts in policy analysis, drawn from planning, information, decision, and game theories. The sources of policy initiatives in the Congress. Strategies and tactics in coalition-building for policy consensus. Negotiation aspects of the policy process. Problems of policy implementation.

CPOL 677: Special Topics in Congressional Studies

3.00 Credits

Special topics to be offered from time to time as warranted by the availability of expert faculty, the special needs of students, or special interest in the light of current political developments - for example, such topics as congressional ethics, congressional transitions, or congressional and media relations.

CPOL 690: Civil War: Termination and Peace Building

3.00 Credits

Examines the factors that contribute to the successful termination of civil wars and the politics of post-conflict reconstruction, with special emphasis on those measures necessary to ensure continuing peace. Students will read significant recent contributions to our thinking about ending civil wars and post-conflict reconstruction, choose a case for analysis, develop a research paper, and present their findings to the class.

CPOL 694: Independent Study - Master's Thesis

3.00 Credits

no description available

CPOL 696: Master's Thesis Research

0 Credits

Staff. This course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

CPOL 698A: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)

0 Credits

no description available

CPOL 698B: Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

0 Credits

Enrollment in this course bills at the equivalent of one credit hour.

CPOL 992: Independent Study

3.00 Credits

Staff.